What is a security plan, and why you should have one.

A security plan is the policies and procedures outlining your strategies to prevent and respond to crime at camp. 

What is Your Plan?

Do you have emergency procedures at your camp? Do you know what to do in case of a fire, flood, medical trauma, or tornado? Do you know some preventative measures to keep campers from hurting themselves or camp property? If you answered yes, (and goodness let’s hope you did), then you should have a security plan at your camp. Just like any other procedure at camp, a security plan helps you react to unforeseeable events. Our camper parents trust us to care for and protect their children, our owners trust us to care for and protect camp property, and our staff trust us to care for and protect them. So, let’s make that happen.

So, what should your plan look like? Well, for starters, it doesn’t have to be complicated like the plans to the Death Star. You simply need to answer two questions: What are you protecting? How are you going to protect it?

What are you protecting?

There are 3 types of assets you should consider when creating a security plan. The first is people (obviously, but let’s be more specific). This can include campers, staff members, visitors - at my camp we include animals. The second is facilities: buildings, equipment, nature, etc. Third is information: records, files, confidential information, passwords, etc. I encourage you to go into great detail when listing your assets, the more you know about what you’re protecting, the better you can figure out how.

How are you going to protect it?

Okay, now that we’ve decided (and prioritized) the things that need guarding, we can determine how we’re going to do so. With people, you may consider communication techniques (walkie talkies), visitor check-in, staff trainings, safety drills, etc. For facilities, think of locking doors, lighting dark paths, managing equipment logs, signing responsibility waivers. Lastly, for information a simple lock or password will do but maybe you can develop ways to train staff about confidentiality in the workplace. 

More Than Just Words on Paper

Sometimes, security plans are more than just words on paper. We must extract these meanings and put them into action: share your plans with staff, share it with your camper parents, get input from other camps and experts. One of the biggest pieces of advice I can give is to take a member of your local law enforcement agency to lunch. Have a discussion about your plan, ask for advice, and give them a tour of camp (I cannot express how important this last one is). 

When creating a security plan, one thing is for sure: something is better than nothing! Don’t worry about creating the most crime-proof camp possible, just worry about getting started to protect what you love most <3

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Katie Dougherty
Program Director
Heart O' the Hills Camp

Criminal Justice has been a passion my whole life! My dad was a military police officer in investigations, so I was always surrounded by cop shows and police life. I have a Criminal Justice Degree from the University of Central Florida with two certificates: Crime Scene Investigation & Criminal Profiling. At UCF I was a member of Alpha Phi Sigma (Criminal Justice Honor Society) as well as Lambda Alpha Epsilon (National Criminal Justice Fraternity). During college I was a 911 Operator for the Seminole County Sheriff’s Office and involved in many volunteer programs for the local Orlando police & fire departments.

I am currently the Program Director at Heart O’ the Hills camp for girls. I spent every summer between 2003 – 2013 at this beautiful place. In January 2018, I moved to Texas from Florida to begin my position as a full-time staff member here at The Heart.

What Teens Really Want... Trust

I wrote this as I was prepping for camp with our teen leadership counselors who will be working with the teen campers this summer at Stomping Ground. I realized we hadn’t spent much time formalizing our philosophy for working with teens and wanted to have some common language to get started. We are facilitating a Teen Leadership Workshop starting April 9th for 4 weeks, all online, all for staff working with teens. Check it out. CIT/LIT Leaders Workshop. - Jack

What Teens really want…

To feel trusted.

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Richard Ryan and Edward Deci, the founders of Self Determination Theory, posit that people are happiest and motivated when their three psychological needs are met. They define those needs as autonomy, belonging, and competence, the ABCs.

Quick aside, when we can get our staff to think about behavior from a “What needs aren’t being met?” perspective it is a game changer. Instead of “That kid is a bad kid.” we can reframe to a “Does Sarah not feel connected? How can I help?” mentality. This is way more effective and way more human.

OK BACK TO TEENS. For teens at camp, think about the three psychological needs.

Self Determination Theory

Belonging

They spend almost the whole time trying to figure out how to build stronger connections. One of the big tools for connection is “just hanging out”. That is what most grownups do and that is a huge part of what teens are looking for. I think we do a pretty awesome job of helping teens and campers find belonging and connection.

Autonomy

This one is harder. How can we create autonomous, supportive spaces at camp while also making sure teens are safe and not hurting others? What about SEX?!

Competence

In Self-Determination Theory, they define competence as the ability to impact the world around you. This one is also hard at camp. Typically teens come for only some portion of the summer. Also, they claim they want more responsibility, but then, let’s be honest, they don’t always really follow through…

TRUST

My take, Competence and Autonomy are really about feeling trusted. I don’t think our teens are looking for that much, they just want us to treat them like adults. We can’t just turn over the keys to camp, but luckily for us, the bar for this is so low because the message most teens get from the rest of the world is that they aren’t worthy of trust.  This provides us with a huge opportunity to connect with them, starting with reasonable trust.

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5 Ways to Build Trust With Teens

(And let’s be honest… PEOPLE)

1) Tell them that you want to build trust with them.

This is the easiest one. On the first night of camp instead of starting with all the rules do a quick recap about how the world seems to tell them that they aren’t worthy of trust and that at camp you want to reverse that. You want to start with trust and realize that we will all mess up, but that you know they are worth trusting and you are excited to build trust with them.

2) Explain why things are the way they are at camp.

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This part is a little harder. Now you have explained that you want to build trust, but you still need to set limits and boundaries. You still are the one who will “make” them do things all week. So explain why. Don’t just have an arbitrary bedtime. Have a bedtime and explain why they need to be quiet for the younger kids. Explain that you have to supervise them because it is the law and because that is the promise we made with their parents. Why can’t they talk about sex or curse? TELL THEM! Connect it to why camp exists and why they are here. If you can’t explain that then stop here and figure out why. Then practice explaining it.

3) Change something about camp when they ask.

Show the teens you value their input. No matter how well you explain your policies and try to make sense they will poke holes. Listen to them and try to change something to be better with their thoughts and ideas. When they push back on bedtime, see if you can do a couple of late nights further from the younger kids or a couple of sleep in days. By listening and then working with them to make a change at camp you are showing that they matter.

4) Ask them for help and share some of your mistakes

Vulnerability is the birthplace of connection. We are going to make mistakes with our teens and we are going to need their help. Instead of waiting for it to happen by accident let’s own it. A lot of times I tell our teens this story about how we tried camp with no bedtimes and what a disaster it was and then ask for some times they have messed up. To wrap it up, I let them know we will all make mistakes this session and it isn’t about the mistakes but how we all work through them together. Sometimes we end with a group pinky swear to have each other’s backs. It is camp after all.

5) Explain why you are at camp and ask them why they are here

This last one might be the most important and can be the easiest to forget. My friend, longtime The Summer Camp Society Member, director of YMCA Camp Minikani, and all around amazing guy, Peter Drews, once said

“FEEDBACK WORKS BEST WHEN I AM COLLABORATING WITH SOMEONE I CARE ABOUT TO HELP THEM DO SOMETHING THEY CARE ABOUT.” - Peter Drews

He was talking about working with staff improvement, but the idea is the same with teens and maybe just everything. This starts with getting on the same page with our teens about what they want from camp. Why are they here? What are they hoping for?

On the first day of camp just ask them. Start by sharing why you are at camp and what you are hoping for and then let them share. At first, my guess is you will get relatively superficial answers like “Make friends” “Do new stuff” “Because I loved last year.” That’s ok. Those are a great start. If you are successful, a huge part of your job will be better understanding the teens you are working with so you can better understand what they are wanting out of camp and struggling with in life. With that understanding, it becomes your job to partner with them to get more of what they are wanting while living in a complex camp community.

LESSONS FROM TURSH

“I think it’s wild when people say ‘teens’ like they’re some big mysterious being we couldn’t possibly understand instead of just like humans?” - Tursh

As I talked more and more with Tursh, one of our teen leadership staff, she said the quote above. In the end, that is the mentality I hope we can get to at camp. Teens are just people. Each one is an individual with individual wants and needs. Certainly there are some different skills or techniques for working with teens than working with 6-year-olds, but we spend too much time labeling teens as teens and not enough time getting to know each individual.

Don’t forget to check out our teen leadership workshop designed for staff leading teens this summer.

CIT/LIT WORKSHOP

Some Articles I Sent to Our Teen Leaders to Start the Conversation

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/08/31/the-terrible-teens
https://yourteenmag.com/family-life/communication/expect-the-worst
https://www.empoweringparents.com/article/inside-your-teens-brain-7-things-your-teenager-really-wants-you-to-know/

JACK SCHOTT
DIRECTOR CAMP STOMPING GROUND
CO-FOUNDER THE SUMMER CAMP SOCIETY
JACK@THESUMMERCAMPSOCIETY.COM
STOMPING GROUND ORIGIN STORY

Kurtz’s Communication Tips for New Seasonal Leaders

Communication Tips for New Summer Camp Seasonal Leaders

As a seasonal leader, communication becomes even more important. In fact, in my experience, most of the most annoying or pointless problems at camp (*ahem* drama!!) happen because there has been a failure in communication—either sharing too much or sharing too little. Here are three techniques I have seen successful seasonal camp leaders use to communicate effectively:

If you like this check out our Seasonal Leadership Training. All all online. $149. Learn More. Heck, use the promo code 50OFF and get $50 off. For now.

1.     Understanding Confidentiality

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In a leadership role, you may have access to (and actually need access to) heaps of confidential information. From health forms to staff evaluations or the “real” scoop on why someone was fired, you may be tempted to share this information with others. Most of the time, it is inappropriate to share confidential information. However, you will have to make a decision whether or not to share it every time you are asked or feel the need to share. This challenge brings me to my first tip: Only share confidential information with someone who can help.

For instance, you may learn from a camper’s confidential health form that she is recovering from an eating disorder. You may decide that it would be appropriate to discuss this information with the camp nurse in order to develop a safe environment and/or learn about considerations you need to make. You may decide that it would be inappropriate to share the information with the arts and crafts instructor—if he knows about this camper’s past eating disorder, it would not necessarily serve to help her.

2.     Communicating Up

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When you have a problem, it is always a good idea to communicate it to your boss. However, what you don’t want to do is make yourself obsolete by always asking your boss for solutions. Plus, in her eyes, it may seem that you are not doing your job. So, when you are faced with a problem, summarize it for your boss, and then tell her your proposed solution or solutions, asking her to weigh in. (Shoutout to my first boss when I was a camp director, Josh Humbel, for giving me this sage advice!)

Even if you have sufficiently solved a problem on your own, it’s always a good idea to fill your boss in. The best technique I have found is a quick summarization email that I would send to her almost immediately after solving the issue. This way, she can point out anything you missed or any required follow-up—and be prepared if she gets a call about the issue.

3.     Soliciting Feedback

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Many seasonal leaders struggle with one of two things: They either try to be the “cool boss” and become too lenient with their staff, or they try to demonstrate their newfound power and become too strict. Both of these traps happen because new bosses are attempting to earn respect, but neither of them work. One of the best ways that I have found to earn the respect of your staff is to ask for their feedback. You can do it in one-on-one conversations pretty easily:

-    “Hey, Jahri, how did check-in go for you yesterday at the Health Hut? Is there anything you think we should consider changing in terms of our health check procedures?”

-    “Elle, you know I am new to this leadership position and I really respect your opinion. What do you think I could try doing differently? I’d love any advice you have for me.”

-    “Sofia, I’m headed to the store to buy some snacks for the staff meeting tonight. What should I get??”

You can also do this in a group setting. For example, before a big staff meeting, tell your staff that you are putting together the agenda and you would love to hear any agenda items that they have. Or, announce to your staff that you will be hanging out in a particular area of camp during free time tonight, and that they are welcome to come chat with you if they have feedback about programming (office hours style). Another way to do this in a group is to use a technique like “fist of five” to see how a certain event went, such as last night’s cookout.

Summary:

-    Only share confidential information with those who can help
-    Always present problems to your boss with your proposed solutions
-    Summarize problems after they are handled by emailing your boss
-    Solicit feedback from individuals on your staff by asking specific questions
-    Incorporate feedback techniques into your day-to-day activities

Let’s get real. When our seasonal leadership team is incredible the summer goes much better. They may be the single most important way to keep camp directors sane and make sure the summer is a success. When my seasonal leadership/admin/core/middle managers are performing well camp just seems to work. Invest in them. Send them to our online training. The best $99 you can spend.

Learn more

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Sarah Kurtz McKinnon is a camp director, consultant and trainer. She's also one of the co-founders and co-facilitators of The Summer Camp Society! Reach her at kurtz@thesummercampsociety.com

Why every summer camp should be running Facebook Ads

Is your camp using Facebook ads? If the answer to this question is no, ask yourself why. Go another level down and look at your own marketing plan and budget. Most summer camps I talk to have the same answer, which is: “We have the same marketing plan and budget that we did last year.” Simply put, change for camps is a hard thing. There are many reasons for this but in the area of marketing budgets, it’s usually because camp directors are not a marketing professionals and do not have the time and resources to invest too much time into this area. Hopefully this blog post will share some knowledge of how you should be looking at your marketing budget and the benefits to putting more $$$ into digital and social media marketing.

The global digital advertising market grew 21% to $88 billion in 2017. Year after year, digital advertising has been growing, especially with the boom of changing medias such as social media and even on-demand TV. Look at your own media consumption. How long do you spend on Instagram vs. sitting down and watching cable television? How much time do you watch cable TV vs Netflix? How long do you spend reaching a print magazine vs reading that Buzzfeed article you saw on Facebook? Review how you and your camp’s parents are viewing media content and get your camps advertising in front of them there. The easier, impactful and measurable way to do this is running Facebook ads!

Unlike print marketing, digital marketing provides clear data for you to see what is working and what is not working with your marketing efforts. With print marketing, you might be doing something like putting up posters around your YMCA or community center and hoping that people see it and contact you for more information. That is just not how the world works anymore...Sadly, people sit on their sofa watching Netflix whilst they scroll on Facebook. This is where you ads need to be placed. With this you can see how many people saw you ad on their social media feed, how many times they clicked on it, and how much it cost you per a click.

When I run ads for camps, I send a report at the end of the ad’s duration informing the camp director of what they are getting for their money. I also look at the data and suggest some changes for the next ad. In reviewing many of these reports, I have made some observations. For instance, I have found that 30-45 second videos have a much higher click through then still photos. By making the small change of changing the media with a post from photo to video, you can make sure you are getting the most for your money. I normally say camps should try it and look at the results and data in order to make decisions going forward. But being able to see where and how your money is going is powerful and an important distinction between print and online advertising.

If you haven’t used Facebook business before, just log in with your Facebook login and start playing around. When I first started to learn, I just watched YouTube videos for a day and then ran some ads and learnt from there.

One of the other great things with running Facebook ads is being able to target your audience in many different ways. Let me explain with an example of a high end music summer camp. Part of the marketing plan is running weekly ads during high times of registration. I worked with them to define a perfect target audience. First, we considered the physical location of the audience members. You may be a small camp which pulls campers all from the same city or you might pull camps from all over the country or even world. This music camp pulls campers from all over the country. So I targeted 10 of the largest cities in the states as the location. Then, we considered the fact that their camper program age is 9 years old to 18 years old. You are able to target JUST parents in Facebook Ads, but also further define your target audience is parents with kids within an age group. Ultimately, I targeted parents who have kids aged 9 to 18 years old within 10 of the largest cities in the States.

Within this group I also targeted parents who have a BA or higher. Okay, so I have targeted highly-educated, parents but I want to target parents who have an interest in my music summer camp. So, for our final criteria, we targeted parents with an interest or hobbies and activities in the following: arts, music, drums, performance arts or singing.

The power of having all of Facebook’s data to target your audience is crazy, and you should 100% be using it.

I hope you enjoyed this blog post and got some ideas about your camp’s marketing plan and using Facebook ads. If your camp is interested in running social media ads and would like TSCS to help, send me an email to setup a time to talk.

20 Things You Can Do This Month To Recruit Male Staff

Recruiting male staff can be incredibly challenging. For whatever reason men are not becoming teachers, nurses, camp counselors or engaging in other helping professions as much as women are. Below are 25 ideas to try to help you get a jump start for recruiting a couple male staff.

I don’t think there is a silver bullet for this. No one of these will net everyone a bunch of staff, but by starting with these and continuing to work on camp culture, living wages, and personal connections you can begin to add up to a camp that doesn’t struggle to for male staff every year. Some camps have plenty of male staff, and there are plenty of college age males out there. What can we do to connect with them and create a space where they want to work? Let’s do it!

1) Call every one of your current male staff and ask them if they know anyone
2) Email coaches for mens college sports teams and ask for a meeting
3) Email current registered families and ask for help
4) Set up a focus group with current male staff
5) Ask one of your seasonal staff to make a video like the one below focused on male staff

6) Get an alumni male staff to write a blog post about how he is a better dad/teacher/etc because of camp. Then send it to local teachers colleges or whatever the topic of his article is.  
7) Call all of last year’s male staff that aren’t returning and ask for feedback. Then beg them to come back.
8) Create a referral system for recruiting staff. You get $100 per staff that finishes the summer.
9) Talk with the people at the front desk at your local Y about who the nicest guys that come in are. Meet them. (When you get desperate…)
10) Is there an all boys high school in your town? Connect with their leadership council.

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11) What is special about your camp? Very outdoors focused? Soccer camp? Liberal values? Make a list of what is different about your camp and another list about what college clubs have similar interests or values. Contact all those clubs at your local colleges.
12) Run targeted Facebook/Instagram ads at men ages 18-22 with those same interests in your area. Make sure the creative (what the ad says) confirms something you already know about who you are targeting. IE: target men interested in social justice with an ad that says: DO YOU BELIEVE IN SOCIAL JUSTICE? WANT TO MAKE AN IMPACT THIS SUMMER? Work at Camp Compassion this summer. Picture of a male staff connecting with a kid.
13) Print you should work at camp business cards and hand them out to all your supporters to share with all the nicest young men they meet.
14) Get all your current local staff to come to a big and simple kickball tournament on a Saturday. Tell them to bring as many friends as they can and supply food, maybe free t-shirts.
15) Send all your current staff posters that say “Great Men Work At Camp (yourcamphere).” To hang in their dorms/houses and ask them to put them up. Maybe include a t-shirt.
16) Run a staff appreciation week on social media with daily memes asking for referrals to male staff
17) Write up a quick blog post to be shared on how to help convince your parents you want to work at camp. Like this https://campstompingground.org/blog/2017/2/7/convincing-your-parents-that-working-at-summer-camp-is-good-for-your-career
19)
Instagram/ Facebook Live with a male staff member about his summer at camp and why he loved working at camp. Share.
20) Actively get your male campers to join your CIT program! (This won’t get you male staff for summer 2019. But will get you male staff for summer 2022.)

Many of these ideas were shared by The Summer Camp Society Members in our community forums. Where conversations and ideas like this build on each other and develop long term friendships and connections. Learn more about our semester long programs and lifelong friendships below.

JACK SCHOTT
DIRECTOR CAMP STOMPING GROUND
CO-FOUNDER THE SUMMER CAMP SOCIETY
JACK@THESUMMERCAMPSOCIETY.COM
STOMPING GROUND ORIGIN STORY

A list of commonly forgotten footage & photos that you need to remember to capture this summer

We all know the feeling: It’s time to make your marketing materials for next summer, and you just don’t have the photos or videos that you need--and won’t be able to capture them for several more months. Unless you want to use that photo from 2009 that has already been on the brochure (we all know the one!), or cross your fingers that no-one recognizes some corny stock images, you’re stuck.

Knowing what marketing images and videos to get can be hard, especially if you try to make a list during the throes of staff training. Don’t worry. In my 5 years overseeing the media team of Camp Echo, I learned a couple of key things for our team to capture. The rest of this blog post is my guide of what to get and how to get it. Getting this footage and these photos can be key to getting some great content for marketing (including for social media) during the off season!

Getting quality b-roll footage

High-quality video is taking over social media. I say the ratio of social media content should be to have 1 video for every 4 photos, which will keep your content fresh and engaging. All most all DSLR cameras have the ability to record HD or even 4K video now. This is a simply add on to your photographer’s role--put capturing this footage into the job description or a make it a mid-summer task for your photographer. Give them a shot lot of 20-40 second clips you want, which will give them a hit list so there are not just taking random footage. It will also be helpful if the photographer has access to a tripod to use for some of these shots. Some footage ideas could be:

  • Camper water skiing

  • High ropes shot from on top of the course

  • Panning shot of campers on a horseback ride

  • Panning shot of the dinning hall in full action

  • Close up of a campfire (make sure to include audio!)

  • Winning the end of session awards

Ask them to give you an update and show you some examples mid-summer. Another tip is have them edit the clips down to 20-40 seconds so it’s easy in the off season to post right on Instagram or use as b-roll footage for your annual campaign.

Countdown to summer

Scrolling through another camp’s social media in the dead of winter, have you seen their sunny photos of a camper holding up a cute chalkboard saying ‘100 days until camp starts!’? Countdown photos are super cool and a good reminder to parents to get their kids signed up for camp. So again with the video, give this task to your media team or photographer in the summer. Give them some ideas of shots:

  • Classic 100/75/50/25 days until camp shots

  • Happy Valentine’s Days shot

  • Happy New Year shot

You get the idea. Make sure you also give them a list of different people to hold the signs. Have a diverse range of campers and staff, any alums who come by camp or, for extra points, the camp director whilst wakerskiing. Keep the ideas fresh and different. Schedule these posts in the right part of the off season. Using software like Hootsuite can be super easy for this. Once, I even got the summer photographer  to schedule them out in the off season. You can also use these countdown photos for off season events/information sessions and more. Think outside the box.

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Camper and counselor shots

Having great camper and counselor shots are fantastic content for recruiting staff and also for your print marketing and more. Shots that show staff engaging in role model behaviour have always been my favorite. Some shots could be:

  • Staff member helping a camper carry his luggage, with the staff member holding one side & camper holding other

  • Staff member checking if life jacket fits right

  • Staff member teaching camper how to swim whilst in water or supporting their back as they do backstroke

  • Staff member teaching camper a new sport like archery or tennis

  • Staff member teaching camper how to make a campfire

You see the theme here--teaching or showing campers how to do a new skill or sport. Essentially, teaching them the values of camp. These photos are great for new staff to show them the impact there will have on a campers life and for parents who want to see staff being safe and showing their campers how to do new things. Planning these shots are key to creating the perfect image which will be used a couple of times in the off season!

I would love if you would share in the comment section below photos or videos you like to plan out before the summer. Above are just some of ones I have developed over my time. Feel free to email me for more ideas!

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GAVIN WATSON
SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGIST 
THE SUMMER CAMP SOCIETY
GAVIN@THESUMMERCAMPSOCIETY.COM

6 Ways To Have a Killer Camp Instagram Feed

1) Create a great bio

When people are choosing to follow your camp, they will head to your profile to check out your feed and also view your bio. Having a great, eye-catching bio could make the difference between them following you or not following you. Bios are important, but you only have 150 characters.

Start off with something descriptive yet to the point, like ‘We are a music summer camp.’ Then, follow with something fun. One idea is to throw some emojis in for your camp’s personality and then have some type of CTA (call to action), like ‘Click below to start the best summer of your life.’ Check out The Walden Schools for a great example. Feel free to follow them, too!

2) Setup Instagram Business

If you don’t use Instagram Business, DO IT NOW. There’s no need to download a new app or anything; just head to your settings then tap ‘Switch to Business Profile.’ The advantage to having Instagram Business is that it opens all kinds of great data to you. This data will be helpful to see what posts are doing well and what you should keep doing or maybe change.

It will tell you when your audience is using Instagram and what days and times you should be posting. This is helpful to get to your audience when they are on the app.

You can also create CTA button on your profiles, which is great for SEO for your website. If you are doing an event or selling a product, you can create buttons right on your profile now! There are so many reasons to get Instagram Business.  

3) Develop a strategy and goals

Many of us are posting on Instagram just to post on Instagram, but there are huge advantages to setting some goals and strategy. You know us camp people...we love goals!

Setting goals can be super easy. For instance, a goal could be to schedule 5 posts for this week or get 10 followers a week. These goals can be tracked and reported. I would suggest creating more impact-oriented goals such as getting 50 people to your website from Instagram or engaging with followers 6 times a week. Set goals, report them and evaluate often.

Creating a strategy can be a bit harder and I suggest doing this as a comprehensive marketing exercise including print, digital and social mediums. Each medium should have a different strategy as your audience is different on each one.

Posting the same content on Facebook and Instagram is a start, but if you want to have a killer presence, this content should be different and each platform have a different strategy. For Instagram, your strategy should be created around your audience which is typically campers, staff and young alumni. Be visual and have a solid feed for people to follow. Also post! There’s nothing I hate more than going to a profile and seeing 6 photos from the past 6 months--there’s no way I am going to follow that account. I need to reason to follow.

4) Know your audience

Carrying on from creating your strategy is knowing your audience. As I mentioned previously, your Instagram audience is going to be campers, staff and young alum. With that build your Instagram calendar around that. Have posts directed at those audiences specifically and seek engagement. Ideas for this might look like this:

Campers:

  • Post a group shot and ask them to comment what session they are coming this summer and who they are coming with.

  • Post a photo of a cabin and ask them what cabin they were in last summer.

Staff:

  • Share memory highlight posts from last summer that only staff is know like some themed event during staff training, or the end of year banquet.

  • Ask them questions about the best night out they had last summer, etc.

Young Alum

  • Highlight them in more recent TBT from the past 10-15 years. Say something like ‘Check out the Coroado Backpacking trip from 2006, spot anyone you know? If so comment them below.’

  • Highlight a popular staff member from back in the day and have a quick Q&A with them as a video or a photo and in the caption section.

5) Share high-quality photos

Most camps will have media staff during the summer who use a DSLR. I encourage camps to only post high-quality photos and videos on Instagram. Yes, iPhone photos are getting somewhat amazing but I can still tell the difference between a high-quality photo and a bad iPhone photo. If you have the photos, use them.

Having organized digital files to key to this success for social media in the of session. You can make digital organization a required component of your media staff members’s jobs. Check out McGaw YMCA Camp Echo’s feed for an example of high-quality photos; there are very few phone photos on this feed.

6) Share high-quality videos

To have a killer Instagram feed you will also need video! I like the ratio of 3 photos for every video. Having them mixed in your feed is key to have audiences engaged and your feed looking fresh. If you have a camp photographer or media staff during the summer set a goal with them to have 100 videos by the end of the summer edited down to 15-45 seconds. Having these ready to post and scheduled for the off season will be a game changer. Don’t over think it: it doesn’t have to be anything amazing; just a stable shot of something at camp which is shot on a DSLR. These small clips also help for b-roll in larger videos like your annual campaign or informational videos.

Having a great camp Instagram should be on your marketing hit list! I truly believe in the impact this social media platform can have on your community--it can influence staff culture even bring new campers to camp. I check my Instagram maybe 100 times a day (seriously!) and, anytime I see something from my home camp on my feed, I like it and it brings a smile to my face.

If you are interested in having a review of your Instagram and giving you some free trips, send me an email! I am happy to help.

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GAVIN WATSON
SOCIAL MEDIA STRATEGIST 
THE SUMMER CAMP SOCIETY
GAVIN@THESUMMERCAMPSOCIETY.COM

Squeaky Wheel Diversity from Sylvia van Meerten

I run an overnight camp for kids with autism and about 5 years ago, we had our first autistic transgender camper. We got a call from this camper’s mom who said, my kid was in a female cabin last year, but now she says she is a boy and wants to be called a boy name and live in a boy cabin. We said “OK” and had a few subsequent conversations about bathrooms and bathing suits and that was that.  We were happy about how this situation turned out. We are glad to see so many camps accept transgender campers and make changes that are specifically intended to make transgender campers feel more welcome. But. If we have to learn to welcome diverse camper populations ONE POPULATION at a time, it’s going to take us forever and that’s not fast enough for me.

I’m not at all blameless here. Part of my job is go around speaking about autism to other summer camp staff, so I’m definitely guilty of spending my air-time focusing on just one population that has been left out of the summer camp party. I regret that, and I’m now working from a new theory. What if the basic principles of diversity and inclusion are the same, no matter what kinds of people you are trying to include?  If this is true, and I think it is, we could all make way more kids (and staff!) feel welcome at our camps in 2019. 

The basic level one diversity principles according to Syl:

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  1. Staffing. Your camp is going to need enough counselors to have some long-ish interactions at least on the first day of camp when everyone new is like “Wait, WHAT did I get myself into??” If we can’t hook up new people with a patient staff member, we might be doing this wrong. 

  2. Facilitated conversations about diversity during staff orientation and the first day campers are on site. We can’t get better at this by not talking about it. 

  3. Illuminate and explain your Hidden Curriculum. All camps have expectations for kids and staff that we do not explicitly teach. Instead, we start to distance ourselves from people who are getting it wrong (think: that person who ‘overshares’, the camper who can’t ‘stay with the group’ even though you can’t define exactly what that means).

  4. Multi-Level programming. Kids should be able to access the game or activity in different ways. If all your programming requires the kids to all do the same thing at the same time, then some kids are going to fail at your version of ‘having fun’ at your camp, which is not what you want at all.

  5. Designated Inclusion Specialist: Ideally, it would be amazing if all your staff were up to snuff on some autism inclusion, and some transgender inclusion, and some inclusions for campers with mental health concerns and some best practices for racial diversity, but if you can’t train them all, why not at least train one? You can send them to our workshop and we will return them to you with more skills! 

Do you care about this?
Feel like your camp could do more?

Check out Syl’s Inclusion Specialist Training for camps

 
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Sylvia van Meerten
Inclusion Trainer, Camp Director, YPO Facilitator
sylvia@chasingsummer.org

3 Things To Ask When Interviewing a Camp Photographer

3 things to ask when interviewing a camp photographer

Hiring photographers, videographers, and media staff for your camp can be challenging. How do you know what questions to ask? Don’t worry, I have you covered. I started my career as a camp photographer back in 2011, and since have mentored, hired, and trained some great photographers for McGaw YMCA Camp Echo. Below I will explain three things you should ask every photographer who applies for a role at your camp. These same questions can be asked to other media staff like videographers, social media staff, and general media staff.

1) ASK FOR A PORTFOLIO

When first reaching out to set up an interview, ask them to send you a portfolio. Request to see the photos that most represent the images they will create this summer. It doesn’t have to be a fancy website. I normally just ask them to share a Google Drive of photos. This is a great way for you to see a few critical things:

  1. What photos they think represent camp. When I look at these portfolios, I’m hoping for outside portraits that include candid shots of people.

  2. What type of camera is used. If they are using a DSLR, this is a good sign that they have made the investment into photography.

  3. The quality of photos and if you like their style and framing. This will help in the interview process.

If the portfolio is not what you are looking for, this is also a good time to filter your applications and not move forward in the interviewing process.

2) WHO IS THE AUDIENCE?

Being able to take photos is one part of being the camp photographer. Knowing who the audience is and how to take photos for that audience is key. In the interview, ask the candidate, “Who do you think the audience of your photos will be this summer?” Hopefully this will tell you a lot about what type of photos they think they will be taking this summer. The answer you are looking for is parents! Bonus points if they talk about safety as well. You are looking for a candidate who understands the importance of their role as camp photographer and how they are representing camp to the outside world--and how their photography can help support the mission of the camp.

3) GO ABOVE AND BEYOND

A great camp photographer will look to go above and beyond in their role. They can do this in many ways. During the interview process, ask them about ways they could go above and beyond in their role this summer. Positive answers could include:

  1. Social Media: creating content, making a social media calendar for the summer, and posting photos. Push them to think of new ways to engage with followers like asking questions on Instagram stories, or making a poll on Facebook, or vlogging on YouTube.

  2. Video work: video is key to create engaging social media content, b-roll for your annual campaign video or interviews with campers and staff. If you can find a candidate with a good background in video, this is great!

  3. Year-round projects - It is hugely beneficial to have a photographer who can create materials that can be used for year-round communications and promotions. Some ideas are Valentine’s Day messages from campers, interviews with staff and campers about why you should sign up for camp to post when registration opens up, or asking donors to give around giving season.

If you can find a candidate who can talk about going above and beyond in their interview in any of these ways, then they are definitely worth your consideration!

I hope these tips help you on your quest to finding a great camp photographer. I feel this is one of the most important roles you will hire this summer. The photographer gives your parents an eye into what is happening at camp. A great camp photographer will provide visual memories for campers to hold onto for a lifetime. Alternatively, a poor hire will lead to lots of angry parent phone calls. Enough said!


If you would like any other advice or support with this process feel free to email me (Gavin)! Good luck!

Gavin watson
Social media strategist 
THE SUMMER CAMP SOCIETY
gavin@THESUMMERCAMPSOCIETY.COM

4 ways your summer camp can benefit from drone videography

Have you seen summer camps with awesome drone footage? Drone footage is becoming a key part of summer camps’ marketing plans as camps adapt to create new, visual content that will stop people from scrolling on their phones. This is an especially important type of footage to capture in our industry, as most summer camps have beautiful landscapes that look even better from a drone! Here are the top four ways that you can utilize drone footage to benefit your camp.

1) STOP THE SCROLL.

Let’s face it: It is hard to get customers to stop scroll on their phone when they see a basic post about your camp on their social media feed. As social media becomes more visual, you have to keep up. Having some beautiful drone footage set to some relaxing music on your Instagram, for example, will do that.

Click here to view one example of how awesome this looks! Once, I interviewed a potential international staff member. He had applied for our camp after seeing some cool drone footage on our Instagram account.

2) GIVE A TOUR.

Drone videography is a great way to do a tour of your camp for new families. You can put footage over a voiceover narration, pointing out key buildings and areas of camp. This can be a great resource to have--imaging sharing a quick YouTube link with a prospective parent via email after you talk with him or her on the phone or at a camp fair about your program.  It’s an excuse to reach out and keep the conversation going, and helps seal the deal on enrollment as they get a visual perspective of what your gorgeous camp is like. This type of video can also help new campers who are nervous about coming to camp, turning their nervous anticipation and excitement.

3) START CONVERSATIONS.

Almost all camps leaders have information sessions with parents, go to job fairs or do in-house parties for prospective parents. Having a reel of drone footage of your camp to play on a screen before or during your event is a great conversation starter and enhances your camp’s professionalism. Check out this 30 minute reel I made for McGaw YMCA Camp Echo.

4) UNIVERSAL USE.

Drone footage can be used in almost any piece of marketing material you are making for your camp. The breathtaking aerial photos can be used on print advertising, and the video footage can be used for b-roll on anything from your annual campaign video to your end-of-session slideshow or the cover on your Facebook page. This type of content will elevate your marketing to a whole new level.


Thank you for reading. This was written by me, Gavin Watson, here at The Summer Camp Society. I have now had my FAA pilot license (drone license) for more than 2 years and have logged almost 100 hours of flying. If you are interested in having drone videographer at your camp this summer, click here to send me an email and start the conversation.

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Gavin watson
Social media strategist 
THE SUMMER CAMP SOCIETY
gavin@THESUMMERCAMPSOCIETY.COM

"Professional development becomes a way of working and thinking"

A note from Kurtz:

Hi, friends! As you may know, applications for the spring semester of The Summer Camp Society are due by this Friday, February 1! The semester will run through mid-April. Anna Hopkins, the amazing director of the amazing Friends Camp in Maine, started off with us as a program participant in the fall of 2017. We love not only the way that Anna thinks but her ability to build community, so we asked her to come on as an additional facilitator this fall. We are so grateful to have her! Anna sent an email to a friend of hers explaining why TSCS is a unique and valuable opportunity, and I got CC’d on it. SO….I am putting it on the blog. Because Anna articulates so well why TSCS exists and why you should join us :-)

The Unique Benefits of TSCS

Taken from an email by Anna Hopkins!

  1. At many conferences you attend, one of the best parts is meeting new colleagues in the camping world. However, with the traditional conference model you'll meet a few interesting folks, but the relationships and connections will peter out after a few days. The Summer Camp Society works to make these relationships last longer and be more valuable. You'll form tight connections and understanding with your weekly online "cohort," with the whole group of folks from your semester AND previous at the conference, and we have a Slack page that is very active about all kinds of topics throughout the year.

  2. The cost of the semester will come out about the same as if you attended something like Tri-States, but it is a more extended timeline so your work over the whole semester is more transformational/imbues all your work for the few months. I've found this to be one of the biggest impacts. Professional development becomes a way of working and thinking, rather than a 3-day experience separate from the rest of your work.

  3. Kurtz and Jack are two of the best "speakers" I've heard in the camp consulting world. TSCS allows you ample time and connections with them, including a 1-on-1 about anything you choose.

  4. TSCS weekly online sessions and the conference are willing to dive into some tricky camp topics that other settings avoid for fear of offending folks-- race and diversity (staff and campers and in general), how to work with a tricky boss, what happens when a big crisis happens at camp, how to respond to a sticky situation with a camper parent, etc.

  5. About 50 people have participated in the program, ranging from executive directors to program directors, to folks in seasonal roles hoping to break into full time camping work. Camps represented are about as diverse as the camps in the US-- this kind of diversity means there will be someone to talk to about any kind of challenge or question you can come up with.

  6. TSCS depends on the insight and experience of its members. You'll be responsible for presenting a 5 minute talk at the conference, and there's other opportunities to step up for leadership if that is something you want. This can be a valuable way to practice your public speaking/ get more of a name in the camp world.

Splitting Up Teams Intentionally

I, like many of you, have used a lot of tricks for splitting up groups.

  • Find a partner, one of you raise your hand, all the hand-raisers are on a team

  • Find everyone with the same third number in your phone number

  • Get into groups with people born in the same month

  • Count off

  • OLD SCHOOL TEAM CAPTAINS?! (Lots to write about here..)

What if we could have kids get into groups with the people they want to play the game with and we try our best to make that happen?

Most of the techniques at the top are designed to split up cliques and encourage campers to expand their friend groups. They are designed to push kids outside their comfort zones so they can make new friends. That’s ok, but what if that isn’t the number one goal.

At Stomping Ground, the camp I help run, we play an all-camp game every night. The night games often have teams, sometimes all the kids are on one team against some staff playing the bad guys. You can see some of our games in the Free Stuff Section of this site.

For us, the goal of the night games is threefold.

  1. We want to create larger than life immersive events that kids will remember and talk about.

  2. We want to end the day on an epic high note giving all of camp a shared experience.

  3. We want to let kids encounter big ideas on their own terms.

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Not everyone participants in all the games, they can opt out, but the goal is to get as many people at camp thinking in the same direction and have a wild time doing it. These games, at Stomping Ground, and at many camps, are many kids favorite part of camp.

If you noticed, for us pushing kids outside their comfort zones or getting them to make new friends during the games are not our highest priorities. This doesn’t mean we don’t hope kids will make friends, but it means we aren’t prioritizing that during these games. We prioritize that at other times.

If that is the case, that we care more about kids loving the experience than pushing making new friends, during the game, than what should we do about making teams?

Side note, if the kids are having the best time ever they tend to also love making new friends. That the making new friends part comes naturally when they are having an awesome time.

What if we just let the kids decide?

We have tried this and the hard part is they tend to make teams that aren’t very fair. I think if given enough time one of the more outspoken, probably older, kids would speak up and explain that the teams aren’t fair and that makes the game less fun, but we haven’t run that experiment.

What if we mostly let the kids decided, but we play the role of that older kid?

What we tend to do is explain the game. Then explain the number of teams and have kids clump together based on who they would like to be with. Then one of our game makers go around and send groups of kids evenly to teams. This let’s us have some control over balancing teams, and let’s kids play the game with the people they want to play with. We find when teams are mostly even and kids are with the people they want to be with the games are dramatically more fun.

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Some other thoughts…

This is more art than science. As the facilitator, like always, we need to be on the lookout for kids possibily being left out or just not actively included.

We have added in recent years the option to instead of choosing your friends you can choose the color or team you want to be on. We do this by sending team captains to four corners of the area and telling kids if they want to choose the color they are on go to the color and if they don’t care please stay in the middle so we can make fair teams. We have found the younger kids tend to be more color-focused and the older kids don’t care about that, but want to make sure they are on the same team as their friends.

At the end of the day the question of how we form teams is about why are we playing the game at all? Why should adults decide? Why should kids decide? Why have teams? By pushing ourselves to answer these questions we can more effectively and intentionally accomplish what we are hoping to accomplish.

If you love thinking about this kind of thing you will love the All Camp Games Workshop we are running in February. All online.

MAKE UP A NEW GAME FOR YOURSELF. GET ACCESS TO THE REST OF THE COHORTS NEW GAMES. BUT MOST OF ALL START TO THINK DIFFERENTLY ABOUT GAME CREATION.

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JACK SCHOTT
DIRECTOR CAMP STOMPING GROUND
CO-FOUNDER THE SUMMER CAMP SOCIETY
JACK@THESUMMERCAMPSOCIETY.COM
STOMPING GROUND ORIGIN STORY

Five Simple Ways to Make Carnivals More Fun

I love carnivals at camp. We call them open camps or station games because they tend to be more than just carnivals, but the games we are talking about have a bunch of stations that individual campers can walk around and go play.

Below are five simple ways to add some more juice to these types of games. If you love this kinda stuff we have a few all camp games in the Free Stuff section of the website and I am leading an online All Camp Games Workshop in February. Check em out.

Let’s get into it!

1) Add Money

Money is fun to play with. Monopoly is a terrible game, but wildly popular. Why? Because you get to play with fake money. Adding some form of currency to games is pretty easy.

Idea: Kids earn between 1 and 5 dollars for every station they complete. With the money, they can buy starbursts or access to another area like the inside of the rec hall for a dance party.

Sheets of Fake Money We Have Used. Use them or make your own.
Tower MoneyCastle MoneyLaura Money (Might be weird if you use this one…)

2) Design Stations for Different Avatars

Making up stations for games is all about thinking about who is going to play them. You know your camp better than anyone. When we design for Stomping Ground we think of about 4-7 real-life kids in the offseason, then as we get to see the kids that are at camp each week we adjust for the different personalities each week.

Some Potential Avatars

  1. Johnny - Rambunctious 8-year-old, high energy, low attention span, loves running around

  2. Teagan - Kinda too cool for school 13-year-old, doesn’t tend to love our games, but does care about younger kids, no sports, creating things is fun, very concerned about their social standing

  3. Gary - 11-year-old, loves pushing people’s buttons, loves RPG style video games, favorite games involve some form of leveling up with friends he can choose

  4. Sarah - 9-year-old, loves the counselors, loves pop music, happy with pretty much anything where she can be silly and interact with staff

You get the idea. How can you design stations that are for the people playing not just for some nebulous group? Johnny will love if there is some form of dodgeball. Teagan will be hesitant to join. How can we make a station that involves just sitting and chilling with their friends?

Here is a quick avatar creation handout we made for a camp training a couple years ago.

3) Create an Unfolding Narrative

Gary, above, will be fine playing most station games but would love if there was something more going on. Think of the Stranger Things kids at a carnival. They aren’t just playing games, they are trying to unearth clues in a much larger story. This is the world we can create for an hour with Gary.

Example: When you get to the fortuneteller’s tent, the fortune teller breaks character to tell kids that the whole carnival has been taken over by aliens. You can tell who the aliens are by looking closely at their left ears. Sure enough, half the staff leading stations have green paint dripping out of their ears. The fortune teller explains that we need to get rid of the aliens and to go see the “maintenance guy” who has been going around picking up trash. Hijinx ensues. Maybe they need to get into the rec hall from above to learn more about the aliens. Maybe there are two ways in. They can pay to get in like everyone else or there is a secret entrance that they can have the maintenance guy’s assistant help them get in if they do a task for him.

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4) Costumes - For Kids

Kids love costumes. Have a station where kids can get in costume and take pictures. Maybe they stay in costume. MAYBE! With money earned from above they can buy costumes. MAYBE! You need a costume to enter the rec hall so you have to buy a costume to get in.

OH ALSO! I read this again after I wrote it and realized this made an assumption that the staff were already in costume. If we don’t have your staff get dressed up for these kinds of things please do. They love it and it adds such a layer of depth to all games and is so fun.

5) Epic Music

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This is a super simple one. Set up speakers and play music the whole time. Whatever the theme is just download a corresponding movie’s soundtrack from Spotify.

  1. Having a Ren Faire? Lord of the Rings

  2. Space? Star Wars

  3. Disney? OK just tons of Disney Songs

Awesome composers have already done the work for us. Music adds an enormous level of immersion just by being on we are having a shared experience.

Let’s Make Awesome Stuff Together

Stations during these events are really fun, and for some number of kids that’s all they need to make friends and build memories. But we have an opportunity each time we run something like this to make it the best moment of camp for some kids let’s take it. What are some of your favorite additions to open camps? Comment below.

Looking to take your all camp games to the next level? Love talking about these kinds of things? Join Our All Camp Games Workshop this February.

ALL CAMP GAMES WORKSHOP

Make up a new game for yourself. Get access to the rest of the cohorts new games. But most of all start to think differently about game creation.

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JACK SCHOTT
DIRECTOR CAMP STOMPING GROUND
CO-FOUNDER THE SUMMER CAMP SOCIETY
JACK@THESUMMERCAMPSOCIETY.COM
STOMPING GROUND ORIGIN STORY


Produce a Summer Video for Your Camp for <$5

This video cost $5

At Friends Camp, we are a pretty small, non-profit operation. Having a "videographer" on staff, or even freeing up a counselor to regularly take video and edit it, isn't in our budget. We were so excited to figure out a solution that worked for us to make an amazing camp video that didn’t cost a lot in time, money, or effort. 

Led by a few of our amazing summer staff (including Summer Camp Society member Lauren), we created a 1-second-per-day video. Check it out below! Here’s the 6 steps you need to take to make your own.

  1. Download an app that will let you take one-second-per-day of video. We used 1 Second Everyday (https://1se.co/). It costs $4.99, and it actually lets you add 2 1-second clips for each day.

  2. Find someone on your staff who can remember to take a short video clip or two each day. Put a reminder on their calendar or somewhere they will see it each day. Our office manager Emma loved this task, because it was an excuse to get out of the office! PS If they miss a day, nothing bad will happen.

  3. The app will let you edit the clips take. It’s SO easy. Partway through the summer, check in on your progress. Do you have enough active clips? Enough of peoples’ faces? Is there something you want to capture that you haven’t yet?

  4. Decide what you want your background sound to be. A favorite camp song of the summer? Or, you could have your staff sing a camp song and record it as a voice memo on your phone.

  5. Find a tech-savvy counselor to make the background music the right length and to add a beginning and ending screen. Say what you will about “Gen Z”, but damn they are good at this kind of thing.

  6. Share all over social media!

Summer Camp Society folks also had some great suggestions about additional ways to use the one-second-a-day video at camp. What other ideas do you have to use this at camp?

  1. Surreptitiously put together a video and surprise your staff with it on the last day.

  2. Have a shared phone that staff can grab and take video, so the video comes from lots of different folks’ perspectives. Even include campers!

Want New Ideas For All Camp Games and Staff Training Sessions?

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ANNA HOPKINS
DIRECTOR -
FRIENDS CAMP
FACILITATOR -
THE SUMMER CAMP SOCIETY
ANNA@THESUMMERCAMPSOCIETY.COM

Sending a Camper Home: Guidelines for Myself

A post from Anna Hopkins, Camp Director at Friends Camp in Maine, co-facilitator of the Emerging Leaders Semester, and one of the best camp directors you probably haven’t heard of, yet.

Anna describing “The Bat” at TSCS Conference Spring 2018

In our weekly TSCS Executive Semester online meeting, we were discussing the topic of sending campers home from camp. Inspired by lessons learned from my camp mentor Nat Shed, I have a little list of "guidelines" for myself to follow any time I send a camper home from camp. I left an abbreviated version of these in a top drawer in my desk this summer, with the intention that it would help me follow good protocol and not get too absorbed in the emotional back-and-forth of kicking a kid out of camp. Jack asked if I could share. Here goes!

(1) There’s usually no need to make a decision this second. It's okay to take a little time to call my mentor/ write a pro-con list/ be quiet for 20 minutes and find the truth of whether or not this camper stay at camp.

(2) If a camper is going home, call the family and arrange a pick-up plan before you tell the child. The last thing you want is an angry or devastated child who then needs to wait 24 hours for a pick-up because his parents are out of town. Tell the camper they are going home about 1-2 hours before parents or guardians arrive, depending on the child and situation.

(3) The time before the child leaves can still be valuable for them. Have a staff member or two who they trust spend time with them, and see if they can have a productive conversation about leaving camp. Maybe they can toss a ball around and discuss their successes and challenges over the last week.

(4) When the child does leave, have an "exit meeting" with the parent and child. Make sure you highlight the child's successes to the parent. If the child is getting kicked out of camp, chances are this has happened to them elsewhere. No child is 100% failure. Failures hurt and add up over time, and if you can help this child see how they still have light inside of them (while being really clear about what boundaries they crossed), that is a good thing. 

(5) If this camper might be able to return next summer, make sure to tell the child and the parents, separately and together. If it’s true, the “you are still welcome here” message can be deeply impactful to campers and families. [Thanks Jason for this addition!]

(6) I tell the camper's cabin group that evening, with a 2-ish sentence explanation. I say it's okay to be sad or to be happy about it, and if people want to talk they can talk to me or their counselor. Kids are not typically surprised.

(7) I tell the whole camp briefly at our next business meeting (happen daily in the morning). I don't offer details about that child, but I let the whole group know they had to leave. I suggest we hold that camper in the Light (Quaker language) and tell campers they are welcome to ask questions to me or another point person if they have them.

(8) Follow up with the camper’s counselor(s). They probably feel like they failed. Go for a walk with them, and reassure them (or have an assistant director with more time go for a walk with them). You can also ask if there’s anything they'd like to do differently next time and hear their perspective on how you handled it as a camp director.

(8) Make a note in the camper's file on CampMinder about everything that happened. I will forget portions by next year, and it will be relevant if this camper wants to try coming back to camp.

(9) Do a face mask that evening after everyone else at camp is asleep. Being the camp director is hard sometimes. Unload to your non-camp support system if you need to. Sometimes someone needs to take care of you, so you can do your best taking care of camp.

Want more free stuff to make running camp easier and awesomer?

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Anna Hopkins
Director -
Friends Camp
Facilitator -
The Summer Camp Society
anna@thesummercampsociety.com

Opening Day Sucks

Let’s think about opening day. I wrote a little questioning our campfire last year, but now I want think a little broader.

We, at Stomping Ground the camp I help run, start each session on Sunday afternoon, one week sessions, and about half the kids stay over the weekend. Quick schedule below.

3:00 - 4:00 - Arrival Window
4:00 - 5:45 - In villages, get to know you games, tours, etc
5:45 - 6:30 - Dinner
6:30 - 7:30 - Village Pump Up Meeting
7:30 - 8:15 - Opening Campfire
8:15 - Back to villages, get ready for bed, village agreements, embers, hangout, bed

First- What is the point of opening day?

To get through it…

But for real, it often seems like the goal of the first day of camp is just to get through it so we can get to the good stuff when camp really starts Monday morning.

Maybe we should just start Monday morning… OR maybe we should just make Sunday more like the rest of the week. That is what we do at Tall Tree, a camp for kids with autism that Sylvia runs. Sylvia is also running an Inclusion Specialist Training for us. It is also what we did the first summer of Stomping Ground. Just start activities basically as soon as kids arrive.

Ok wait!

What is the point of opening day?

Logistically

  1. Actually get the kids to camp

  2. Welcome parents

  3. Welcome kids

  4. Collect meds

  5. Lice Checks

  6. See where they will sleep/poop/shower

  7. Learn the rules

  8. Meet their counselors

  9. Meet the kids in their cabin

  10. Get a glimpse of the culture

  11. Eat

  12. Sign up for Monday’s activities (might be cool to do the swim check?)

  13. See what camp looks like

  14. Opening Campfire? → back to this again…

Those are the tangible things, but the crux of what we want is for kids to feel comfortable and excited about being at camp and start getting to know each other. What would it look like to do that differently?

Let’s ignore some logistical problems for now and just try a different schedule for after kids arrive….

3-4:30 pm - Normal check-in process and some initial get to know you games in cabins
4:30-5:30 pm - Free Choice Option (include an option for a tour or something similar)
5:30-6:15 pm - Dinner
6:30-7:00 pm - Campfire
7:00-8:15 pm - Cabin Time
8:15 pm - Bedtime stuff ← need to look closer at all of this later too.

What are the problems?

  • No time for village cheers. Do we care?

  • What happens when kids arrive late? ← some always do.

  • What happens at Bed Time?

  • What is “Cabin Time”?

Cabin Time…

The goal is…  

  • To make a little memory with the kids in your cabin.

  • Build a bond between the campers and the staff.

  • Do something fun to get buy in

What if we make up 20 mini adventures that cabins could go on? Then from the campfire each cabin goes on their adventure and meets back up in the village for night time stuff after their adventure ends.

Then each staff could easily make their own cabin time up, but having an easy choice for folks would lower the difficulty to get started and raise the floor for the activity.

The big problem I see is around the lack of choice here. For all our other activity times there is a huge amount of choice. Kids can go to Downtown Stomping Ground or pick different options.

Where would this be the biggest problem? Older kids. Ok, ok, ok.

We don’t typically have age segregated programming except for sleeping, but if we are going to have them stay in their cabins anyway what if we do things a little differently based on village? We have four villages based loosely by age. From youngest to oldest, Explorer, Viking, Robinhood, and Pioneer. What if Pioneer always went somewhere for a village event that had some built-in choice, hangout time, and maybe a conversation about how they are leaders at camp?

How would that play out in Robinhood? This is hard to say because we are expanding capacity in Viking and Explorer and I am not sure what the age breakdowns will be, but I think it could work pretty well.

One of the keys I think would be that it was a small group on the adventure so getting out of the main field would be important for most groups.

What could some of the options be?

  • Pioneer goes to… The Lava Lounge for something similar to the After Party from ArtsFest

  • Smores in Mountaineer

  • Ice cream in boats

  • Bake a cake in the staff kitchen (wait these are all just food… Maybe that is the key? Just a snack party for each cabin?)

  • Fire tower

  • Archery… boring

  • Outpost cookout

  • Newt catching

  • Explorer creek walk

  • Fort building by Viking

  • Some kind of dodgeball type game (maybe the game assault?) Could be 2 cabins

  • What could people do in the dining hall?

  • These still need a lot of work, but I bet we could just ask some of the staff to make some up this offseason.

To simplify, we make a signup list for staff that gets passed around during the Sunday big staff meeting with supplies that we order for each week. We always order ice cream, cake making stuff, whatever to be used on the first night. Plus snacks for Pio in the Lava Lounge. This way it gets systematized and if people want to do special stuff that is awesome, but at least we have a base.

The new setup would be a pretty simple change. More choice before dinner and a fun cabin activity with a lot of snacks likely after dinner and village meetings moved to Monday.

WHAT DO YOU DO FOR OPENING DAY?! WHAT HAS BEEN AWESOME?

Did you know Kurtz and I put up a bunch of free staff training sessions, all camp games, and more? Check em out.

Schott Jack.jpg

JACK SCHOTT
DIRECTOR CAMP STOMPING GROUND
CO-FOUNDER THE SUMMER CAMP SOCIETY
JACK@THESUMMERCAMPSOCIETY.COM
STOMPING GROUND ORIGIN STORY

Building a Culture of Partnership Instead of Power Over With Our Staff

This is Peter Drews!

Why do some challenging conversations with staff lead to huge impact and while most at best lead to tiny changes?

This week in The Summer Camp Society Semester we were talking about difficult conversations with staff and Peter Drews, YMCA Camp Minikani, gave us a profound takeaway. We were trying to narrow in on what was true about the tough conversations we have had with staff that lead to the biggest breakthroughs. Peter said:

“When I am collaborating with someone I care about to help them do something they care about.”

I am in.

Think about it. The most effective helping conversations happen when you are working together with one of your best friends to help them solve a real problem they want to solve.

Kurtz has some thoughts and Mike O’Brien chimes in with a great staff training session at the end of this article.

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Now there are a lot of incredibly challenging aspects of this, but it gives us a goal and a place to start, mostly a place to start way before the tough convo.

  1. How can I build closer relationships with the people I supervise so I can know what they care about and so they know I care about them?

  2. What does my camp really care about and how can I make sure we are articulating this to staff when we hire them so they can decide if they care too?

  3. How do I make sure the policies and topics of these tough conversation line up with what we are saying we care about?

Kurtz’s Staff Training on Practicing Coworker Confrontations

This is a huge undertaking. Here is where I am going to start with Stomping Ground. Jack actually do this you lazy dog!

  1. What Happened? - Compile a list of as many tough conversations that happened this summer as you can. Look through incident reports and staff evaluations.

    1. I think if I were doing this exercise, I'd also want some direct input from staff. I'd call my unit directors, my wellness coordinator, and my assistant summer camp director. I'd ask them to think about the corrective conversations they had to engage in most this summer.- Peter

  2. Breaking It Down - Categorize them by what you think the problem is. This will take some thinking. Is it level of engagement, timeliness, violating a specific policy? Which category has the largest number of conversations?

    1. I can see how frequency of conversations is really important. I think I'd also want to look at the list I compiled and think about the conversations that most spoke to our core values. When were my staff members doing something that felt like it really flew in the face of our values? Is that happening consistently? Is that behavior happening more in one unit or with one staff member more than with others? I'd want to identify patterns, to learn more about where our staff culture can improve. - Peter

  3. What Do We Care About? - Now, this is the hard part. Dig into this category for what is actually happening and figure out why, really why, this policy is necessary for camp and in alignment with what camp really cares about. Pick a handful of staff that are likely to break this policy. What do they care about that overlaps with why this policy is in place?

    1. I love this. It's another place where a phone call might be a good idea. - Peter

  4. Explain It - Write a quick one-pager not just explaining the policy, but explaining the overlap between what your staff members care about and why the policy exists. Try to really give them the benefit of the doubt, it is November so that is easier. Why should they care? What else do they already care about? Be as specific as possible.

  5. Do Something - At this point, feel free to change the policy, make plans to change your staff, or make plans to change how you hire staff. My hope is that by picking the most frequent problem with staff I can either get more staff on board or just change the policy.

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It is not always the case that when people believe in something they can do it, but it is a million times easier to have a conversation with someone when they are invested in making the same change we are.

“When I am collaborating with someone I care about to help them do something they care about.”

Thank you Peter.

KURTZ CHIMES IN...

BABY KURTZ!

BABY KURTZ!

Some thoughts from Kurtz while she is taking care of her newborn. #businessMOM #mba #BABYKURTZ #yesshecandoitall

It’s kind of like the same technique in principled negotiations (win-win negotiations). There is a summary of the principled negotiation book. The “interests” part is what might be most pertinent to this convo.

Principled Negotiation: Interests:

  • The difference between interests and positions is crucial: interests motivate people; they are silent movers behind the hubbub of positions. Your position is something you have decided upon, while your interests are what caused you to decide.

  • You can ask for another's position, making clear that you do not want justification, just a better understanding their needs, hopes, fears, or desires that they serve.

  • The most powerful interests are basic human needs: security, economic well-being, sense of belonging, recognition, control over one's life

  • If you want the other side to take your interests into account, explain to them what those interests are

  • Make your interests come alive - be specific!

  • Acknowledge their interests as part of the problem - be sure to show your appreciate their interests if you want treatment in like kind

  • Put the problem before your answer: give your interests and reasoning first and your conclusions or proposals later

  • Look forward, not back: instead of asking someone to justify what they did yesterday, ask "Who should do what tomorrow?"

  • Be concrete but flexible: treat the opinion you formulate as simply illustrative - final decision to be worked on later

  • Be hard on the problem, soft on the people: show you are attacking the problem, not people - give positive support to the humans on the other side equal in strength to the vigor you emphasize the problem - this causes cognitive dissonance and in order for the other to overcome it they will be tempted to disassociate from the problem in order to join you in doing something about it”

https://richardstep.com/downloads/tools/Notes--Getting-to-Yes.pdf

A Staff Training Session From Mike O’Brien

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Camp Director, Camp AJ, Kentucky

We ran what turned out to be a great session during staff training this summer on a similar topic that ended up helping all of us align our goals for camp.

We posted a bunch of large sheets of paper around the room with a question at the top, things like "What should we expect from our campers?" and the converse "What should our campers expect from us?" There were questions relating to leadership, parents, peers, CIT/LITs, as many relational aspects of camp as we could come up with.

Then each staff person was given a stack of post it notes and as a group we went around the room and wrote words or short statements answering the question and sticking it on the sheet.

After about 20 minutes or whenever most folks had a chance to think about all the questions, we broke up into small groups and each group was assigned one of the large sheets of paper. Those groups then discussed and ranked what they felt were the top 3-5 most important/most meaningful answers, and then presented that to the whole group for discussion.

The end result was great discussions about expectations vs reality, what things matter a lot and what things don't really, and also gave leadership some great insight from our staff about what they expected from us as well as how they perceived our relationships with them. SO GOOD!

BE A PART OF THESE CONVERSATIONS

Schott Jack.jpg

JACK SCHOTT
DIRECTOR CAMP STOMPING GROUND
CO-FOUNDER THE SUMMER CAMP SOCIETY
JACK@THESUMMERCAMPSOCIETY.COM
STOMPING GROUND ORIGIN STORY

The Staff Are Like Our Campers... Or Are They?

This is a post from the newly made up, “We can disagree, but still care about each other.” column. We are making t-shirts, hopefully, to be slyly given to everyone in America. The it starts with my hot take followed by a couple different perspectives. If you like this kind of article, with different points of view and perspectives comment below. Let’s get into it!

OH! There is some light cursing under the heading, “They Said” at the beginning of the article.

- Jack Schott

Camp directors often say, “The staff are like our campers.” I get where they are coming from, and I would never say that.

I think the thought process is that as camp directors or leaders we need to take care of our staff the same way we ask our staff to take care of their campers. We need to put as much work into making sure they are doing well as we ask them to do for the kids. This is admirable and something I can get behind.

However, I think the phrasing can come off as patronizing.

I thought I might be alone so I texted some of our staff at camp...

“What would you think if you heard a camp director say ‘The staff are like my campers’”

They said…

DSC_0127.jpg

“Kinda patronizing.”
“I think it is sweet and well-meaning, but I'd rather be told ‘the staff are like my co's’. Idk which is more true tho.”
“No for sure, for sure, director/counselor counselor/camper are similar in that everyone is IN on FUN and the expression is probably used to distance from traditional employer/employee sort of relationship but I mean come on guy you’ve got a pet… You’ve got a responsibility, You don’t just look for an hour then call it quits…” → Billy Madison Reference
“Huuuuge little bitch move.”
“Disrespect!”
“Stop being such a big BIOTCH.”
“Boo”
“Also sounds kitchy (?)”
“Even if they mean it in a “i am like their counselor, they are like my campers, I want to help them grow and learn” way then it still negates any idea of counselors having a say in camp as a whole / creating a reciprocal relationship with all staff”
"But for realsies, another interesting piece of that is the implication of director's idea of counselor/camper roles.”

Two things are certainly true.

  1. They like to curse via text.

  2. They may be a little more rebellious and more likely to dislike this idea than most.

“The staff are like our campers.”  comes from a very good place, but I think it misses the point.

As camp directors, we clearly love the campers and so treating our staff like campers means treating them with love, but it also has the connotation that we are treating them like kids. Maybe that is what camp directors are saying when they say that. I don’t think so, but maybe.

I am not interested in treating summer staff like kids or assuming that they will act like children.

At camp, we put a huge amount of trust in our staff. They have to both be childlike and playful and at the same time some of the most responsible young adults you can imagine. We, as camp pros, make arguments all the time about how great a growth opportunity it is to work at camp as compared to internships or other jobs.

I don’t think most camp directors mean they want to treat their staff like kids when they say “The staff are like my campers”, but it can be how many staff take it.

Maybe even more than that, I think these words have power and when we say things like “The staff are like my campers” it can lead to a culture where we may not mean to, but we encourage a larger divide between our leadership staff and the staff they supervise. That it leads to more of a power over dynamic than a partner with relationship.

Also, I realize this is a hot take and was chatting with some other folks in The Summer Camp Society looking for some different perspectives. Here are some of their thoughts.

- Jack

Anna Hopkins

Director, Friends Camp, Maine

While I see that some counselors might find this language condescending, I also think that it can be useful when used well. Working at camp can be pretty intimidating for a first-time counselor (maybe a counselor of color at a mostly white camp, a counselor who used to be camper and is really nervous about trying to live into the role of the counselors who he used to hero-worship, or a staff member who is in the US for the first time to work at your camp). Many camps are facing a challenge of staff members bailing a few weeks before the summer, quitting the first week of camp, or even “ghosting” and not showing up for staff week.

DSC_0114.jpg

Staff members, and those new to camp especially need to feel empowered to bring their crazy ideas, take the lead in potentially dangerous situations, and be the “grown-up” for nervous campers. I think perhaps the best way to help these new staff members become their most empowered selves is to give them support and help them feel like they belong-- two jobs best done by the camp counselors.

The very best camp counselors feel the weight of their responsibility. Maintaining a physically and emotionally safe environment for a group of about 10 children (while canoeing/ camping/ battling dragons) is no joke. However, the weight of this responsibility can sometimes cause good counselors to experience anxiety or make it hard for them to let loose and be silly.

In telling my camp counselors that they can think of me as their counselor, I hope to take off some of that weight. When a camper comes to them and makes a disclosure of abuse, I want them to be able to cry about it with me if they need to and know that I will take it from there. If they get a call from home that their dad is sick and they need to travel home, I don’t want them to feel bad asking me for the time off. If a friend from home is texting them with thoughts of self-harm, I want them to know they can talk to me and I will find someone to cover their cabin while they help their friend.

I agree with my colleagues who say we want to be “partners” with our staff rather than condescending or paternalistic. But in much the same way that campers don’t have the same level of responsibility for camp that their counselors do, camp counselors don’t have the same level of responsibility for camp that the camp director does. When I tell my staff they can trust me and use me as their “camp counselor” if they need to, I hope that it relieves them from feeling like they need to know all the answers right away. If we consider the camper/counselor relationship to be “disrespectful” or “condescending” when applied to adults, what does it say about how we are treating our campers?

- Anna

Katrina Dearden

Assistant Executive Director, Eagle Island Camp, New York

I can see where this phrase would come from and why a Camp Director might choose to use it.  We want what is best for the staff and we know that we need to provide a level of support to them in order for them to be successful.  But I think this phrase also comes from a level of selfishness.

We miss having campers.  

Camp Directors and leaders got into this industry because we loved camp, we loved having a group of kids who saw the potential in us, who joined in on our fun games.  And it’s really hard to give that up as you move up the ladder at camp. So in some ways I think claiming the staff are our campers is just our way of still clinging to the desire to have our own groups of kids.  And that’s not fair to us and it is especially unfair to the staff. Because they are not our campers, they are not here to blindly follow us and our activities. We have hired them to make good decisions, to be responsible for their own groups of campers.  We hired them to push back when something doesn’t make sense, to let us know when there is a better or safer way to do things. Or a better way to connect with the current camper trends and interests.

The staff are not our campers, they are our camp staff.

- Katrina

Ben Clawson

Executive Director, Lindley G. Cook 4H Camp, New Jersey

A few times, when addressing a staff culture issue (i.e. staff talking behind each others backs instead of addressing the problem directly, etc…) I’ve made the mistep of saying to the counselors involved, “how would we react if our campers were treating each other this way?” I think it’s a good, valid point! However, I have seen in my staff’s eyes that they do not think it’s a good, valid point:  “It’s way different than the campers!  We’re young adults in a very complex social situation with a lot being asked from us all the time!” (And it certainly wouldn’t be helpful for me to counter that our 12 year olds probably feel the exact same way.)

At its best, I like to think of camp as a potential antidote to a lot of what’s not-so-great with the rest of the world. I think one of those not-so-great things is that young adults are very used to being treated like children, and having the low expectations of children put upon them. At camp, we ask for so much more. Not only are the counselors not the children, but they are entirely responsible for every aspect of the children’s camp-life, and we hold them to standards that would never be expected from a child. We ask for 24-hours-a-day of solid decision making, responsible judgement, endless energy, boundless creativity, and ever-diligent compassion all wrapped up with imperviously buoyant morale. It might be more than has ever been asked of them, and it’s why so many staff take such pride and joy in clearing the bar and “accomplishing camp.”  Being a counselor at summer camp might very well be the most adult, least-childlike thing they have ever done.

This can be a tough idea for those of us at camps where a large percentage of our campers matriculate onward to become counselors; it can be harder not to think of a staff member as your camper when they literally were your camper a matter of months earlier. And, in reality, our counselors are the highest evolution of what we hope for from our campers - they’re often the best examples of our program’s long-lasting positive effects, and a personification of the promise that the program will continue to produce those effects in the future. Yes, for directors, our counselors might totally be our kids: our oldest, most trusted and esteemed campers.

But perhaps we shouldn’t spend too much time explicitly telling them that.

- Ben

THANK YOU ANNA, BEN, AND KATRINA!

Do you love these kinds of discussions and want to be a part of them every week? Check out our semester long options. 600 bucks for weekly discussions, a great network, and an inclusive conference. There is no other deal like it for professional development. Check it OUT

Schott Jack.jpg

JACK SCHOTT
DIRECTOR CAMP STOMPING GROUND
CO-FOUNDER THE SUMMER CAMP SOCIETY
JACK@THESUMMERCAMPSOCIETY.COM
STOMPING GROUND ORIGIN STORY

Growth Not Retention.

I spent the weekend pouring over the retention numbers at Stomping Ground, the camp I run. I think I decided retention is overrated.

For context, I have believed retention to be the number one indicator of great camps for the last 5 or 7 years. I am huge fan of Camp Augusta, who boasts above 90% retention every year, maybe 95% I can remember the exact number. I love James Davis’s model on the economics of retention. I believed retention to be the best indicator of camp success.

This weekend I lost my faith.

Ok, I am being dramatic, but I dug deep on our retention and found some interesting facts that are leading me to think differently about retention. I think retention can be incredibly valuable but is just one metric.

This week in The Summer Camp Society Semester we were talking about the value of retention. The ethics of using staff to convince kids to come back for another year and different tactics for increasing the rate kids might return to camp. We discussed progressive programming, connecting with parents, awards, and more. Then we started talking about the numbers.

Retention isn’t just one number it is a combination of an uncountable number of variables. Male vs Female return rate, ages that return at different rates, what about new campers vs old campers.

#theregoesmyweekend

This got me thinking. I hadn’t calculated our retention at Stomping Ground since our first summer in 2015. There goes my weekend.

I put together a bunch of spreadsheets, why CampBrain doesn’t do this with a click of a button is fascinating. Rob if you are reading this let’s talk. I did this in the most straightforward way. No aging out or removing kids for any reason. If they came to camp one year and came back the next they counted. This matters because you can play with these numbers in a million ways. Here is what I found.

Our Numbers

2015 (our first summer) - 44% of kids returned for 2016
2016 - 58% of kids returned for 2017
2017 - 66% of kids returned for 2018

What the heck does that mean?

I don’t know, but I went to school. 44% is for sure failing. 66% is failing but a little better. It seems like an improvement. I did a bunch of other math. I won’t bore you with all of it, but I found that our retention rate for male and female campers is essentially the same. That we have the highest retention rate for 6 year olds (our youngest kids) and the lowest for 14 year olds (our oldest main campers), but in the middle everything is basically the same. I found that rain has less impact on retention than I thought, but good counselors have much higher impact.

I am happy to run these numbers for you for a donation to camp. Ok, I’ll donate it to camp, but a donation can’t be quid pro quo so you have to pay me then I donate to camp. Laws. Not for profits. Math. Send me an email.

jack@thesummercampsociety.com

GROWTH

Most importantly I found growth. Over that same time period that our retention failed, never breaking 70% we also 10x-ed the size of our camp. We went from ~60 kids the first summer to ~600 camper weeks this last summer. What was happening?

I definitely don’t have all the answers, but I have an idea. I found two other interesting tidbits.

  1. While our retention rates mostly stunk our retention rates for returning campers are pretty good. Last year ~90%. So if someone had been to Stomping Ground before and came back at least once, the chance that they would return again was very high.  Camp Champions has a person dedicated to first year camper retention for this reason.

  2. Campers that were returning were signing up for more weeks. A lot more weeks, in some years averaging almost twice as many.

WHAT DOES THIS MEAN!?!!?!?@!?!!?!?!@?

Growing a program isn’t about retention it is about growth. Of course, it is. But this matters!

We made Stomping Ground up. It never existed. We have messed up, tried things, tried other things. Our first summer we didn’t have bedtimes. ← real life.

The best way to grow fast isn’t to be pretty ok for most of our small number of campers it is to be hecking awesome, best place ever, life-changing, for the right families.

When we do that we grow like mad. When we blow every other place that specific families have ever worked with out of the water they send their kids back for longer and tell everyone they know.

SWING FOR THE FENCES

I think this is interesting and I think it changes huge parts of the way we do business. This rewards swing for the fences commitment to mission and encourages us not to round our edges for parents that don’t get what we want to do.

We let kids play with hammers and nails at camp. Kids choose how to spend their days all day every day. They get in arguments and we don’t kick kids out just for fighting. We do weird stuff. We do it safely, but for the right families, this is what they are looking for.

This math is pushing me to double down on what makes us weird. Pushing me to put ourselves more out there for what we believe in and then not compromise our program to please parents that “don’t get us”.

DOUBLE DOWN

This doesn’t mean we should listen to parent concerns or stop trying to get better and change. It doesn’t mean we shouldn’t care. Just the opposite. It means we should really care. We should really care about what we really care about. We should double triple quadruple down on connecting our mission to our program, because when we do that, the right people love it and they tell their friends. There are lots of “regular” camps out there.

Trying to be a “great” regular camp is a bad long-term strategy.  

I got excited at the end there, but you get the point. Retention isn’t bad, but it isn’t always good either. I need to keep figuring out what Stomping Ground cares about and then do more of that, explain why, and the right people will care. Or they won’t.

JACK SCHOTT
CO-FOUNDER/DIRECTOR CAMP STOMPING GROUND
CO-FOUNDER THE SUMMER CAMP SOCIETY
JACK@THESUMMERCAMPSOCIETY.COM
STOMPING GROUND ORIGIN STORY

An Introduction to Interviewing Camp Staff

At Stomping Ground, the sleepaway camp I started with Laura Kriegel in 2015, we just hired our first year-round assistant director. Allison Klee, or Klee, has worked with us for three years. You may know her from her videos on how to help staff prepare for the summer.

Anyway, she is awesome and really gets what we do at Stomping Ground, but is still new at so many aspects of her new role. My guess is many of you are in a similar position to either Klee, a new year-round camp person, or me, helping onboard new year-round camp homies. With that in mind, I thought I would share what I shared with Klee about our staff hiring process. Maybe this will become an ongoing series, On-Boarding Klee - A New Assistant Director’s Journey.

Below is an email I sent to Klee, edited a little for context and some fun photos added.


Klee!

It’s already staff hiring season. We have had a couple new folks apply already. Through this - Apply to Stomping Ground.

Let’s talk process.

  1. Staff apply through the website and give us a few pieces of simple information so we can get started.

  2. Then, I will reach out to them to set up an initial conversation.

  3. Most of our applicants tend to be solid so I will connect them with you to have a conversation. I will share my notes with you.

  4. You will talk with them.

  5. You check their references.

  6. Then we decide what to do next. We either offer them the job or have Laura talk with them to learn more.

  7. Then we send them this page on the website to make sure they really want the job.

The Interview

Interviewing is hard. Some people say interviews don’t work at all. So what is the point? At the highest level it is to see if they will do well in the job they are applying for. OK! That is a start. What is the job they are applying for? Let’s talk cabin counselors at Stomping Ground. What if we broke down being a counselor into 5 major categories?

JISE XT (We need a better acronym)

Judgment (Understand and align with the mission, vision, and practical nature of camp)
Initiative (Ability to consistently start)
Supervision (Awareness of assigned areas and campers)
Engagement (Emotional involvement or commitment)
X-Factor (What makes them special?)
Team (How do they make others better?)

Maybe EXITS?

Engagement, X Factor, Initiative, Team, Supervision/Judgment

You can use this for notes or make your own.

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Some Questions to Get Started

Tell me about a time when you had to make a hard decision.

  • What are you hoping to get out of this summer?

  • How did you decide what to do as you after high school? Walk me through your thinking.

  • Tell me about a time you were with kids and had to be the “grownup”

  • When you are with a group of friends what role do you find yourself playing?

    • Tell me about a time where you played that role

  • I noticed on your resume that you… tell me about how you got started with that.

  • Tell me about a time you made a one on one relationship recently.

  • Tell me about your ideal day

  • Tell me about a challenge you have overcome

  • Brag about cool stuff you have done. Pretend I am your new best friend

  • What are some cool hobbies/skills/talents you have?

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Informed Consent

This is a weird idea or maybe just a weird phrase to use.

Something obvious: the best counselors are the counselors that know what they are doing. The earlier we can help them know what they are opting into the higher the probability of success. One way to do that is to retain staff. Another is to grow staff from the camper base. The hardest, and one we have to do a lot at Stomping Ground, is getting new staff up to speed as quickly as possible. This starts in the interview process.

I will talk with everyone that applies about the hours, the workload, the lack of self-care time, etc. The goal isn’t to scare them away but try to give them as accurate a picture of the job as possible so that they can make an informed decision about whether the job is right for them.

I don’t have statistics, but anecdotally it seems that when we can really get people to understand this the mental health of staff have been much higher and performance much better. The You’re Hired Page has helped a lot with this. Along with the Don’t Take This Job If Video.

Other stuff....

Ok so I think you have a pretty good understanding of what we are thinking about for the process. Below are a couple of links to some resources that I think will better set you up to actually do the interview. TAKE A LOOK!

A Short Video on Interviewing Camp Counselors

Laura Kriegel, Scott Arizala, and I made a video about interviewing a few years ago. I think the key takeaway is to ask follow up questions that give more insight into what we are looking for and ask questions that lead to stories of real-life not hypotheticals.

Gary Forester and POWER Hiring

Gary was the number one camp consultant for a long time. He grew up in the Y, eventually was the go-to Y camp guy, then became a consultant for all camps. He is sort of retired now, but his writings are still some of the best and most influential in the camp world. Check out his advice for interviewing here.

How to Interview
Let's Go Fishing

Actually trying to read everything on Gary’s old school website is definitely worth doing. The design is out of date and some of his thoughts seem dated, but 98% of what he is talking about is still incredibly relevant.

http://garyforster.com/library.php

Let’s do this!
Jack


I hope this was useful! Kurtz and I get together with camp pros every week to talk about what is working, what isn’t, and how we can help each other. It is the best deal in professional development on the planet. $699 for 8 weeks of real time online discussion and a 3 day retreat. Check it out. The Summer Camp Society Semester.

JACK SCHOTT
CO-FOUNDER/DIRECTOR CAMP STOMPING GROUND
CO-FOUNDER THE SUMMER CAMP SOCIETY
JACK@THESUMMERCAMPSOCIETY.COM
STOMPING GROUND ORIGIN STORY